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sitting in a proper position. Infants and small children are at an even greater risk of injury or death.

What you should do: Always wear your seat belt properly, and sit upright and as far back as possible from the steering wheel or dashboard.

Airbags

Your car has a Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) with frontal airbags to help protect the driver and a passenger.

This system also includes SRS an indicator light on the instrument panel to alert you to a possible problem with the system.

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss What you should do: Move the seats as far back as possible, and keep adjustable seat-backs in an upright position whenever the car is moving.

Head Restraints Head restraints can help protect you from whiplash and other injuries.

Door Locks Keeping your doors locked reduces the chance of being thrown out of the car during a crash. It also helps prevent occupants from accidentally opening a door and falling out, and outsiders from unexpectedly opening your doors.

Your Car's Safety Features

Seats & Seat-Backs Your car's seats are designed to keep you in a comfortable, upright position so you can take full advantage of the protection offered by seat belts and the energy absorbing materials in the seats.

How you adjust your seats and seat- backs can also affect your safety. For example, sitting too close to the steering wheel or dashboard increases the risk of you or your passenger being injured by striking the inside of the car, or by an inflating airbag.

Reclining a seat-back too far reduces the seat belt's effectiveness and increases the chance that the seat's occupant will slide under the seat belt in a crash and be seriously injured.

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Both doors are closed and locked (see page 12 ).

All cargo is properly stored or secured (see page 124).

The rest of this section gives more detailed information about how you can maximize your safety.

Remember, however, that no safety system can prevent all injuries or deaths that can occur in severe crashes, even when seat belts are properly worn and the airbags deploy.

Pre-Drive Safety Checklist To make sure you and your passenger get the maximum protection from your car's safety features, check the following each time before you drive away:

You and any adult passenger, or a larger child who has outgrown child seats, are wearing your seat belts and wearing them properly (see page 15 ).

A small child riding in a forward- facing child seat is properly restrained (see page 26).

Occupants are sitting upright and as far back as possible from the steering wheel and dashboard (see page 12 ).

Seat-backs are upright (see page 13).

Your Car's Safety Features

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Protecting Adults

Introduction The following pages provide instructions on how to properly protect adult occupants.

Your car has a door monitor light on the

instrument panel to indicate when a specific door is not tightly closed.

These instructions also apply to a child whom you have decided is large enough and mature enough to ride as a passenger. (See page 29 for important additional guidelines on how to properly protect larger children.)

For safety, locking the doors reduces the chance that a passenger, especially a child, will open a door while the car is moving and accidentally fall out. It also reduces the chance of someone being thrown out of the car during a crash.

1. Close and Lock the Doors After everyone has entered the car, be sure the doors are closed and locked.

For security, locked doors can prevent an outsider from unexpectedly opening a door when you come to a stop.

See page 62 for how to lock the doors.

2.Adjust the Front Seats

Any driver who sits too close to the steering wheel is at risk of being seriously injured or killed by striking the steering wheel, or from being struck by an inflating airbag during a crash.

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss To reduce the chance of injury, wear your seat belt properly, sit upright with your back against the seat, and move the seat as far back as possible from the steering wheel while still maintaining full control of the car. Also make sure your passenger moves the seat as far to the rear as possible.

Sitting too close to an airbag can result in serious injury or death if the airbags inflate.

Always sit as far back from the airbags as possible.

Most shorter drivers can get far enough away from the steering wheel and still reach the pedals. However, if you are concerned about sitting too close, we recommend that you investigate whether some type of adaptive equipment may help.

Once your seat is adjusted correctly, rock it back and forth to make sure the seat is locked in position.

See page 69 for how to adjust the seats.

3.Adjust the Seat-Backs Adjust the driver's seat-back to a comfortable, upright position, leaving ample space between your chest and the airbag cover in the center of the steering wheel. If you sit too close to the steering wheel, you could be injured if the airbag inflates.

Protecting Adults

A passenger should also adjust the seat-back to an upright position, but as far from the dashboard as possible. A passenger who sits too close to the dashboard could be injured if the airbag inflates.

CONTINUED

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Protecting Adults

Reclining a seat-back so that the shoulder part of the belt no longer rests against the occupant's chest reduces the protective capability of the belt. It also increases the chance of sliding under the belt in a crash and being seriously injured. The farther a seat-back is reclined, the greater the risk of injury.

Reclining the seat-back too far can result in serious injury or death in a crash.

Adjust the seat-back to an upright position and sit well back in the seat.

See page 69 for how to adjust seat- backs.

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss 4.Fasten and Position the Seat

Belts

Insert the latch plate into the buckle, then tug on the belt to make sure the belt is securely latched. Also check that the belt is not twisted, because a twisted belt can cause serious injuries in a crash.

Protecting Adults

spreads the forces of a crash over the strongest bones in your upper body.

Improperly positioning the seat belts can cause serious injury or death in a crash.

Make sure all seat belts are properly positioned before driving.

Never place the shoulder portion of a lap/shoulder belt under your arm or behind your back. This could cause very serious injuries in a crash.

CONTINUED

Driver and Passenger Safety

Position the lap part of the belt as low as possible across your hips, then pull up on the shoulder part of the belt so the lap part fits snugly. This lets your strong pelvic bones take the force of a crash and reduces the chance of internal injuries.

If necessary, pull up on the belt again to remove any slack from the shoulder part, then check that the belt rests across the center of your chest and over your shoulder. This

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Protecting Adults

If a seat belt does not seem to work as it should, it may not protect the occupant in a crash. No one should sit in a seat with an inoperative seat belt. Anyone using a seat belt that is not working properly can be seriously injured or killed. Have your Honda dealer check the belt as soon as possible.

See page 33 for additional information about your seat belt system and how to take care of your belts.

Driver and Passenger Safety

5.Maintain a Proper Sitting

Position

After occupants have adjusted their seats and put on seat belts, it is very important that they continue to sit upright, well back in their seats, with their feet on the floor, until the car is parked and the engine is off.

Sitting improperly can increase the chance of injury during a crash. For example, if an occupant slouches, lies down, turns sideways, sits forward, leans forward or sideways, or puts one or both feet up, the chance of injury during a crash is greatly increased.

In addition, an occupant who is out of position can be seriously or fatally injured by striking interior parts of the car, or by being struck by an inflating airbag.

Sitting improperly or out of position can result in serious injury or death in a crash.

Always sit upright, well back in the seat, with your feet on the floor.

Remember, to get the best protection from your car's airbags and other safety features, you must sit properly and wear your seat belt properly.

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Advice for Pregnant Women

Protecting Adults

Because protecting the mother is the best way to protect her unborn child, a pregnant woman should always wear a seat belt whenever she drives or rides in a vehicle.

Remember to keep the lap portion of the belt as low as possible across your hips.

Pregnant women should also sit upright and as far back as possible from the steering wheel or dashboard. This will reduce the risk of injuries to both the mother and her unborn child that can be caused by a crash or an inflating airbag.

Each time you have a check-up, ask your doctor if it's okay for you to drive.

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Protecting Adults

Additional Safety Precautions

Two people should never use the same seat belt. If they do, they could be very seriously injured in a crash.

Do not put any accessories on seat belts. Devices intended to improve occupant comfort or reposition the shoulder part of a seat belt can severely compromise the protective capability of the seat belt and increase the chance of serious injury in a crash.

Do not place hard or sharp objects between yourself and an airbag. Carrying hard or sharp objects on your lap, or driving with a pipe or other sharp object in your mouth, can result in injuries if your airbags inflate.

Keep your hands and arms away from the airbag covers. If your hands or arms are close to the airbag covers in the center of the steering wheel and on top of the dashboard, they could be injured if the airbags inflate.

Do not attach or place objects on the airbag covers. Any object attached to or placed on the covers marked "SRS AIRBAG," in the center of the steering wheel and on top of the dashboard, could interfere with the proper operation of the airbags. Or, if the airbags inflate, the objects could be propelled inside the car and hurt someone.

Driver and Passenger Safety

tMain MenuTable of Contentss Children who are unrestrained or improperly restrained can be seriously injured or killed in a crash.

Any child too small for a seat belt should be properly restrained in a child seat. A larger child should be properly restrained with a seat belt.

Children depend on adults to protect them. However, despite their best intentions, many parents and other adults may not know how to properly protect young passengers.

So if you have children, or if you ever need to drive with a grandchild or other children in your car, be sure to read this section.

Protecting Children

All Children Must Be Restrained Each year, many children are injured or killed in vehicle crashes because they are either unrestrained or not properly restrained. In fact, vehicle accidents are the number one cause of death of children ages 12 and under.

To reduce the number of child deaths and injuries, every state and Canadian province requires that infants and children be restrained whenever they ride in a vehicle.

Any child who is too small to wear a seat belt should be properly restrained in a child seat. (See page 26.)

A larger child should always be restrained with a seat belt. (See page 29.)

Driver and Passenger Safety

stMain MenuTable of Contents Protecting Children

Your Car is Not Recommended for Child Passengers We strongly recommend that you do not carry any child in this car. One reason is that your car does not have a back seat, and accident statistics show that a child of any size or age is safer when they are properly restrained in the back seat of a vehicle.

In addition, your car has a passenger's airbag which poses serious risks to children — particularly infants and small children.

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