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GENERAL MOTORS, GM, the GM Emblem, BUICK, the BUICK Emblem and the name CENTURY are registered trademarks of General Motors Corporation. This manual includes the latest information at the time it was printed. We reserve the right to make changes after that time without further notice. For vehicles first sold in Canada, substitute the name “General Motors of Canada Limited” for Buick Motor Division whenever it appears in this manual. Please keep this manual in your vehicle, so it will be there if you ever need it when you’re on the road. If you sell the vehicle, please leave this manual in it so the new owner can use it.


Canadian Owners YOU can obtain a French copy of this manual from your dealer or from: Helm, Incorporated P.O. Box 07130 Detroit, MI 48207 How to Use This Manual Many people read their owner’s manual from beginning to end when they first receive their new vehicle. If you do this, it will help you learn about the features and controls for your vehicle. In this manual, you’ll find that pictures and words work together to explain things. Index A good place to look for what you need is the Index in back of the manual. It’s an alphabetical list of what’s i n the manual, and the page number where you’ll find it.


General


Litho in U.S.A. @Copyright


Part No. 10325196


First Edition


Motors Corporation All Rights


06/19/02 Reserved


ii


Safety Warnings and Symbols


You will find a number of safety cautions in this book. We use a box and the word CAUTION to tell you about things that could hurt you if you were to ignore the warning.


These mean there is something that could hurt you or other people.


In the caution area, we tell you what the hazard is. Then we tell you what to do to help avoid or reduce the hazard. Please read these cautions. If vou don’t, you or others could be hurt.


You will also find a circle with a slash through it in this book. This safety symbol means “Don’t,’’ “Don’t do this” or “Don’t let this happen.”


... Ill


Vehicle Damage Warnings Also, in this book you will find these notices: Notice: These mean there is something that could damage your vehicle. A notice will tell you about something that can damage your vehicle. Many times, this damage would not be covered by your warranty, and it could be costly. But the notice will tell you what to do to help avoid the damage. When you read other manuals, you might see CAUTION and NOTICE warnings in different colors or in different words. You’ll also see warning labels on your vehicle. They use the same words, CAUTION or NOTICE.


Vehicle Symbols Your vehicle has components and labels that use symbols instead of text. Symbols, used on your vehicle, are shown along with the text describing the operation or information relating to a specific component, control, message, gage or indicator. If you need help figuring out a specific name of a component, gage or indicator reference the following topics:


Seats and Restraint Systems in Section 1 Features and Controls in Section 2 Instrument Panel Overview in Section 3 Climate Controls in Section 3 Warning Lights, Gages and Indicators in Section 3 Audio System(s) in Section 3 Engine Compartment Overview in Section 5


iv


These are some examples of vehicle symbols you may find on your vehicle:


/i\


CAUTION POSSIBLE INJURY


PROTECT


LATCH BOTH LAP AND SHOULDER BELTS TO PROTECT OCCUPANT


DO NOT TWIST SAFETY BELT WHEN AnACHING


$8: @


SHIELDING


I CAUSTIC


BATERY ACID COULD


BURNS


CAUSE %


FASTEN SEAT BELTS


\$$=


MOVE SEAT FULLY


REARWARD+ />


SECURE CHILD SEAT


DO NOT INSTALL A REAR-FACING CHILD RESTRAINT IN THIS SEATING POSITION


PULL BELT


COMPLETELY THEN SECURE CHILD SEAT


'\I/'


AVOID SPARKS OR FLAMES


SPARK OR FLAME COULD EXPLODE BAITERY


DO NOT INSTALL A 'ORWARD-FACING CHILD RESTRAINT IN THIS SEATING POSITION


1 I


8- 0 , \


ENGINE COOLANT TEMP


LIGHTING -


MASTER SWITCH


SIGTNUARL:


LAMPS pf


BATTERY CHARGING SYSTEM


BRAKE (@)


COOLANT a


:'tu


ENGINE OIL PRESSURE w


RUNNING LAMPS


OWNER'S MANUAL


SERVICE


NOTES


vi


Section 1 Seats and Restraint Systems


Safety Belts ....................................................


Front Seats ...................................................... Manual Seats ................................................ Six-Way Power Seats Reclining Seatbacks ....................................... Head Restraints ............................................. Rear Seats ......................................................


1-2 1-2 ..................................... 1-3 -1-3 1-5 .l -6 Split Folding Rear Seat ................................... 1-6 -1-7 ................. 1-7 Safety Belts: They Are for Everyone Questions and Answers About Safety Belts ...... 1-11 How to Wear Safety Belts Properly ................. 1-12 Driver Position ................................... .... 1-12 .................. 1-21 Safety Belt Use During Pregnancy Right Front Passenger Position ....................... 1-21 ............................. 1-22 Center Passenger Position .................................. 1-24 Rear Seat Passengers Rear Safety Belt Comfort Guides for


Children


3 d l e l y Dell LXiel Idel


.....................................


and Small Adults ....................................... 1.27 . ^ ^ 1 -LY Child Restraints ............................................. 1-30 Older Children .............................................. 1-30 Infants and Young Children ............................ 1-32 Child Restraint Systems ................................. 1-36 Where to Put the Restraint ............................. 1-39


n - 1 - r


n .


t-


Top Strap .................................................... 1.40 Top Strap Anchor Location ............................. 1-42 Lower Anchorages and Top Tethers for


Children (LATCH System) ...........................


1-42


Securing a Child Restraint Designed for the


LATCH System ......................................... Securing a Child Restraint in a Rear Outside


1-45


Seat Position ............................................ 1-45


Securing a Child Restraint in a Center Rear


1.48


Seat Position ............................................ Securing a Child Restraint in the Right Front Seat Position ............................................


1-50 Air Bag Systems ............................................ 1-53 Where Are the Air Bags? ............................... 1-56 Inflate? .................... 1-58 When Should an Air Bag Inflate? ..................... 1-59 What Makes an Air Bag How Does an Air Bag Restrain? ..................... 1-59 What Will Ynll Spp After 3.n .Air Rac !nf!gtoc? ...... .-! -eQ Servicing Your Air Bag-Equipped Vehicle ......... 1-62 Restraint System Check .................................. 1-63 Checking Your Restraint Systems ................... 1-63 Replacing Restraint System Parts


After a Crash ............................................ 1-63


1-1


Front Seats Manual Seats


Lift the bar located under the front of the passenger’s seat. This will unlock the seat. Slide the seat to where you want it and release the bar. Try to move the seat to be sure the seat is locked into place.


1 -2


Six-Way Power Seats


Reclining Seatbacks


Your vehicle is equipped with this feature on the driver’s side of the vehicle. It may also be equipped with this feature on the passenger’s side of the vehicle. The controls for the power seats are located on the outboard sides of the seat cushions.


To move the seat forward or rearward, push the control forward or rearward. To raise or lower the entire seat, push the control up or down. To raise or lower the front of your seat, push the front of the control up or down. To raise or lower the rear of your seat, push the rear of the control up or down.


Lift the lever located on the outboard side of the seat to release the seatback, then move the seatback to where you want it. Release the lever to lock the seatback in place. Pull up on the lever without pushing on the seatback and the seatback will move forward.


1-3


Sitting in a reclined position when your vehicle is in motion can be dangerous. Even if you buckle up, your safety belts can’t do their job when you’re reclined like this. The shoulder belt can’t do its job because it won’t be against your body. Instead, it will be in front of you. In a crash you could go into it, receiving neck or other injuries. The lap belt can’t do its job either. In a crash the belt could go up over your abdomen. The belt forces would be there, not at your pelvic bones. This could cause serious internal injuries. For proper protection when the vehicle is in motion, have the seatback upright. Then sit well back in the seat and wear your safety belt properly.


3ut don’t have a seatback reclined if your vehicle is moving.


1 -4


Head Restraints


Adjust your head restraint so that the top of the restraint is closest to the top of your head. This position reduces the chance of a neck injury in a crash.


’ -5


Rear Seats


Split Folding Rear Seat


To return the seatback to its original position, push it back up and make sure it latches.


If your vehicle has this feature it allows you to have access to the trunk from the inside of your vehicle. Pull forward on the seat tab, located on the front of the rear seat, to fold the rear seatback down.


1 -6


Safety Belts


Safety Belts: They Are for Everyone This part of the manual tells you how to use safety belts properly. It also tells you some things you should not do with safety belts.


Don’t let anyone ride where he or she can’t


’ wear a safety belt properly. If you are in a


crash and you’re not wearing a safety belt, your injuries can be much worse. You can hit things inside the vehicle or be ejected from it. You can be seriously injured or killed. In the same crash, you might not be, if you are buckled up. Always fasten your safety belt, and check that your passengers’ belts are fastened properly too.


IC IS extremely dangerous to ride in a cargo area, inside or outside of a vehicle. In a collision, people riding in these areas are more likely to be seriously injured or killed. Do not allow people to ride in any area of your vehicle that is not equipped with seats and safety belts. Be sure everyone in your vehicle is in a seat and using a safety belt properly.


Your vehicle has a light that comes on as a reminder to buckle up. See Safety Belt Reminder Light on page 3-29.


In most states and in all Canadian provinces, the law says to wear safety belts. Here’s why: They work.


1-7


Why Safety Belts Work When you ride in or on anything, you go as fast as it goes.


You never know if you’ll be in a crash. If you do have a crash, you don’t know if it will be a bad one. A few crashes are mild, and some crashes can be so serious that even buckled up, a person wouldn’t survive. But most crashes are in between. In many of them, people who buckle up can survive and sometimes walk away. Without belts they could have been badly hurt or killed. After more than 30 years of safety belts in vehicles, the facts are clear. In most crashes buckling up does matter ... a lot!


Take the simplest vehicle. Suppose it’s just a seat on wheels.


1 -8


6- 1


The person keeps going until stopped by something. In a real vehicle, it could be the windshield ...


or the instrument panel ...


1-10


Questions and Answers About Safety Belts


accident if I'm wearing a safety belt?


Q: Won't I be trapped in the vehicle after an A: You could be - whether you're wearing a safety belt or not, But you can unbuckle a safety belt, even if you're upside down. And your chance of being conscious during and after an accident, so you can unbuckle and get out, is much greater if you are belted.


Q: If my vehicle has air bags, why should I have to A: Air bags are in many vehicles today and will be in


wear safety belts?


most of them in the future. But they are supplemental systems only; so they work with safety belts - not instead of them. Every air bag system ever offered for sale has required the use of safety belts. Even if you're in a vehicle that has air bags, you still have to buckle up to get the most protection. That's true not only in frontal collisions, but especiaiiy in siae ana other coiiisions.


1-1 1


or the safety belts! With safety belts, you slow down as the vehicle does. Y"! set !?-!ere ?!?e tc! stcp. Y X s k p S'JCY EC.::: and your strongest bones take the forces. That's why safety belts make such good sense.


zlistzzcc,


home, why should I wear safety belts?


Q: If I’m a good driver, and I never drive far from A: You may be an excellent driver, but if you’re in an accident - even one that isn’t your fault - you and your passengers can be hurt. Being a good driver doesn’t protect you from things beyond your control, such as bad drivers. Most accidents occur within 25 miles (40 km) of home. And the greatest number of serious injuries and deaths occur at speeds of less than 40 mph (65 km/h). Safety belts are for everyone.


How to Wear Safety Belts Properly This part is only for people of adult size. Be aware that there are special things to know about safety belts and children. And there are different rules for smaller children and babies. If a child will be riding in your vehicle, see Older Children on page 1-30 or Infants and Young Children on page 1-32. Follow those rules for everyone’s protection. First, you’ll want to know which restraint systems your vehicle has. We’ll start with the driver position. Driver Position This part describes the driver’s restraint system.


1-12


Lap-Shoulder Belt The driver has a lap-shoulder belt. Here’s how to wear it properly. 1. Close and lock the door. 2. Adjust the seat so you can sit up straight. To see


how, see “Seats” in the Index.


3. Pick up the latch plate and pull the belt across you.


Don’t let it get twisted. The shoulder belt may lock if you pull the belt across you very quickly. If this happens, let the belt go back slightly to unlock it. Then pull the belt across you more slowly.


4. Push the latch plate into the buckle until it clicks.


Pull up on the latch plate to make sure it is secure. If the belt isn’t long enough, see Safety Belt Extender on page 1-29. Make sure the release button on the buckle is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.


1-13


5. To make the lap part tight, pull down on the buckle end of the belt as you pull up on the shoulder belt.


1-14


The lap part of the belt should be worn low and snug on the hips, just touching the thighs. In a crash, this applies force to the strong pelvic bones. And you'd be less likely to slide under the lap belt. If you slid under it, the belt would apply force at your abdomen. This could cause serious or even fatal injuries. The shoulder belt should go over the shoulder and across the chest. These parts of the body are best able to take belt restraining forces. The safety belt locks if there's a sudden stop or crash, or if you pull the belt very quickly out of the retractor.


Shoulder Belt Height Adjuster Before you begin to drive, move the shoulder belt adjuster to the height that is right for you. Adjust the height so that the shoulder portion of the belt is centered on your shoulder. The belt should be away from your face and neck, but not falling off your shoulder.


To move it down, squeeze the release lever and the shoulder belt guide as shown and move the height adjuster to the desired position. You can move the adjuster up just by pushing up on the shoulder belt guide. After you move the adjuster to where you want it, try to move it down without squeezing the release lever to make sure it has locked into position.


1-15


Q: What’s wrong with this?


You can be seriously hurt your shoulc is too loose. In a crash, you would move forward too much, which could increase injury. The shoulder belt should fit against your body.


?It


A: The shoulder belt is too loose. It won’t give nearly


as much protection this way.


1-16


Q: What’s wrong with this?


A: The belt is buckled in the wrong place.


You can be seriously injur- -~ if your bel buckled in the wrong place like this. In a crash, the belt would go up over your abdomen. The belt forces would be there, not at the pelvic bones. This could cause serious internal injuries. Always buckle your belt into the buckle nearest you.


Q: What’s wrong with this?


y injured if you wear the


You can be seriol shoulder belt under your arm. In a crash, your body would move too far forward, which would increase the chance of head and neck injury. Also, the belt would apply too much force to the ribs, which aren’t as strong as shoulder bones. You could also severely injure internal organs like your liver or spleen.


A: The shoulder belt is worn under the arm. It should


be worn over the shoulder at all times.


1-18


Q: What’s wrong with this?


A: The belt is twisted across the body.


You can be seriously injured by a twisted belt. In a crash, you wouldn’t have the full width of the belt to spread impact forces. If a belt is twisted, make it straight so it can work properly, or ask your dealer to fix it.


1-19


To unlatch the belt, just push the button on the buckle. The belt should go back out of the way. Before you close the door, be sure the belt is out of the way. If you slam the door on it, you can damage both the belt and your vehicle.


1-20


Safety Belt Use During Pregnancy Safety belts work for everyone, including pregnant women. Like all occupants, they are more likely to be seriously injured if they don’t wear safety belts.


A pregnant woman should wear a lap-shoulder belt, and the lap portion should be worn as low as possible, below the rounding, throughout the pregnancy. The best way to protect the fetus is to protect the mother. When a safety belt is worn properly, it’s more likely that the fetus won’t be hurt in a crash. For pregnant women, as for anyone, the key to making safety belts effective is wearing them properly. Right Front Passenger Position To learn how to wear the right front passenger’s safety belt properly, see Driver Position on page 7-72. The right front passenger’s safety belt works the same way as the driver’s safety belt - except for one thing. If you ever pull the shoulder portion of the belt out all the way, you will engage the child restraint locking feature. if this happens, just let the belt go back all the way and start again.


1-21


Center Passenger Position Lap Belt


If your vehicle has front and rear bench seats, someone can sit in the center positions.


1-22


When you sit in the center seating position, you have a lap safety belt, which has no retractor. To make the belt longer, tilt the latch plate and pull it along the belt.


To make the belt shorter, pull its free end as shown until the belt is snug. Buckle, position and release it the same way as the part of a lap-shoulder belt. If the belt isn’t long enough, see Safety Belt Extender on page 1-29. Make sure the release button on the buckle is positic so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.


med


1-23


Rear Seat Passengers It’s very important for rear seat passengers to buckle up! Accident statistics show that unbelted people in the rear seat are hurt more often in crashes than those who are wearing safety belts. Rear passengers who aren’t safety belted can be thrown out of the vehicle in a crash. And they can strike others in the vehicle who are wearing safety belts. Rear Seat Outside Passenger Positions


Lap-Shoulder Belt The positions next to the windows have lap-shoulder belts. Here’s how to wear one properly.


1-24


1. Pick up the latch plate and pull the belt across you.


Don’t let it get twisted. The shoulder belt may lock if you pull the belt across you very quickly. If this happens, let the belt go back slightly to unlock it. Then pull the belt across you more slowly.


2. Push the latch plate into the buckle until it clicks. Pull up on the latch plate to make sure it is secure.


When the shoulder belt is pulled out all the way, it will lock. If it does, let it go back all the way and start again. If the belt is not long enough, see Safety Belt Extender on page 1-29. Make sure the release button on the buckle is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.


3. To make the lap part tight, pull down on the buckle end of the beit as you puii up on the shoulder part.


The lap part of the belt should be worn low and snug on the hips, just touching the thighs. In a crash this applies force to the strong pelvic bones. And you’d be iess iikeiy io siiae unaer rne iap belt. it you slld under It, the belt would apply force at your abdomen. This could cause serious or even fatal injuries. The shoulder belt should go over the shoulder and across the chest. These parts of the body are best able to take belt restraining forces.


1-25


The safety belt locks if there’s a sudden stop or a crash, or if you pull the belt very quickly out of the retractor.


You can be seriously hurt if your shoulder belt is too loose. In a crash, you would move forward too much, which could increase injury. The shoulder belt should fit against your body.


1-26


To unlatch the belt, just push the button on the buckle.


Rear Safety Belt Comfort Guides for Children and Small Adults


Your vehicle may have this feature already. If it doesn’t, you can get it from any GM dealer. Rear shoulder belt comfort guides will provide added safety belt comfort for older children who have outgrown booster seats and for small adults. When installed on a shoulder belt, the comfort guide better positions the belt away from the neck and head. There is one guide available for each outside passenger position in the rear seat. To provide added safety belt comfort for children who have outgrown child restraints and booster seats and for smaller adults, the comfort guides may be installed on the shoulder belts. Here’s how to install a comfort guide and use the safety belt:


1. Pull the elastic cord out from between the edge of the seatback and the interior body to remove the guide from its storage clip.


1-27


2. Slide the guide under and past the belt. The elastic cord must be under the belt. Then, place the guide over the belt, and insert the two edges of the belt into the slots of the guide.


3. Be sure that the belt is not twisted and it lies flat. The elastic cord must be under the belt and the guide on top.


1-28


To remove and store the comfort guides, squeeze the belt edges together so that you can take them out of the guides. Pull the guide upward to expose its storage clip, and then slide the guide onto the clip. Turn the guide and clip inward and in between the seatback and the interior body, leaving only the loop of the elastic cord exposed. Safety Belt Extender If the vehicle's safety belt will fasten around you, you should use it. But if a safety belt isn't long enough to fasten, your dealer will order you an extender. It's free. When you go in to order it, take the heaviest coat you will wear, so the extender will be long enough for you. The extender will be just for you, and just for the seat in your vehicle that you choose. Don't let someone else use it, and use it only for the seat it is made to fit. To wear it, just attach it to the regular safety belt.


1-29


4. Buckle, position and release the safety belt as


described in Rear Seat Passengers on page 1-24. Make sure that the shoulder belt crosses the shmh-kr


If you have the choice, a child should sit next to a window so the child can wear a lap-shoulder belt and get the additional restraint a shoulder belt can provide. Q: What is the proper way to wear safety belts? A: If possible, an older child should wear a


lap-shoulder belt and get the additional restraint a shoulder belt can provide. The shoulder belt should not cross the face or neck. The lap belt should fit snugly below the hips, just touching the top of the thighs. It should never be worn over the abdomen, which could cause severe or even fatal internal injuries in a crash.


Accident statistics show that children are safer if they are restrained in the rear seat. In a crash, children who are not buckled up can strike other people who are buckled up, or can be thrown out of the vehicle. Older children need to use safety belts properly.


Child Restraints


Older Children


Older children who have outgrown booster seats should wear the vehicle’s safety belts.


1-30


I Never do this.


Here two children are wearing the same belt. The belt can’t properly spread the impact forces. In a crash, the two children can be crushed together and seriously injured. A belt must be used by only one person at a time.


Q: What if a child is wearing a lap-shoulder belt, but the child is so small that the shoulder belt is very close to the child’s face or neck? A: Move the child toward the center of the vehicle, but be sure that the shoulder belt still is on the child’s shoulder, so that in a crash the child’s upper body would have the restraint that belts provide. If kilt: ciliiu is siiiirly irl a rear seai ouisiae posiiion, see Rear Safety Belt Comfort Guides for Children and Small Adults on page 1-27. I f the child is so small that the shoulder belt is still very close to the child’s face or neck, you might want to place the chi!d in the center seat position, the m e that has only a lap belt.


1-31


Never do this. Here a child is sitting in a seat that has a lap-shoulder belt, but the shoulder part is behind the child. If the child wears the belt in this way, in a crash the child might slide under the belt. The belt’s force would then be applied right on the child’s abdomen. That could cause serious or fatal injuries.


Wherever the child sits, the lap portion of the belt should be worn low and snug on the hips, just touching the child’s thighs. This applies belt force to the child’s pelvic bones in a crash.


Infants and Young Children


Everyone in a vehicle needs protection! This includes infants and all other children. Neither the distance traveled nor the age and size of the traveler changes the need, for everyone, to use safety restraints. In fact, the law in every state in the United States and in every Canadian province says children up to some age must be restrained while in a vehicle.


1-32


Every time infants and young children ride in vehicles, they should have the protection provided by appropriate restraints. Young children should not use the vehicle’s adult safety belts alone, unless there is no other choice. Instead, they need to use a child restraint.


People should never hold a baby in their arms while riding in a vehicle. A baby doesn’t weigh much -- until a crash. During a crash a baby will become so heavy it is not possible to hold it. For example, in a crash at only 25 mph (40 km/h), a 12-lb. (5.5 kg) baby will suddenly become a 240-lb. (110 kg) force on a person’s arms. A baby should be secured in an appropriate restraint.


1-33


Children who are up against, or very close to, any air bag when it inflates can be seriously injured or killed. Air bags plus lap-shoulder belts offer outstanding protection for adults and older children, but not for young children and infants. Neither the vehicle’s safety belt system nor its air bag system is designed for them. Young children and infants need the protection that a child restraint system can provide.


1-34


Q: What are the different types of add-on child A: Add-on child restraints, which are purchased by the


restraints?


vehicle’s owner, are available in four basic types. Selection of a particular restraint should take into consideration not only the child’s weight, height, and age but also whether or not the restraint will be compatible with the motor vehicle in which it will be used. For most basic types of child restraints, there are many different models available. When purchasing a child restraint, be sure it is designed to be used in a motor vehicle. If it is, the restraint will have a label saying that it meets federal motor vehicle safety standards. The restraint manufacturer’s instructions that come with the restraint state the weight and height limitations for a particular child restraint. In addition, there are many kinds of restraints available for children with special needs.


Newborn infants need complete support, including support for the head and neck. This is necessary because a newborn infant’s neck is weak and its head weighs so much compared with the rest of its body. In a crash, an infant in a rear-facing seat settles into the restraint, so the crash forces can be distributed across the strongest part of an infant’s body, the back and shoulders. Infants always should be secured in appropriate infant restraints.


1-35


Child Restraint Systems


An infant car bed (A), a special bed made for use in a motor vehicle, is an infant restraint system designed to restrain or position a child on a continuous flat surface. Make sure that the infant’s head rests toward the center of the vehicle.


The body structure of a young clL j is quite unlike that of an adult or older child, for whom the safety belts are designed. A young child’s hip bones are still so small that the vehicle’s regular safety belt may not remain low on the hip bones, as it should. Instead, it may settle up around the child’s abdomen. In a crash, the belt would apply force on a body area that’s unprotected by any bony structure. This alone could cause serious or fatal injuries. Young children always should be secured in appropriate child restraints.


1-36


I


A rear-facing infant seat (B) provides restraint with the seating surface against the back of the infant. The harness system holds the infant in place and, in a crash, acts to keep the infant positioned in the restraint.


A forward-facing child seat (C-E) provides restraint for the child’s body with the harness and also sometimes with surfaces such as T-shaped or shelf-like shields.


1-37


Q: How do child restraints work? A: A child restraint system is any device designed for use in a motor vehicle to restrain, seat, or position children. A built-in child restraint system is a permanent part of the motor vehicle. An add-on child restraint system is a portable one, which is purchased by the vehicle’s owner. For many years, add-on child restraints have used the adult belt system in the vehicle. To help reduce the chance of injury, the child also has to be secured within the restraint. The vehicle’s belt system secures the add-on child restraint in the vehicle, and the add-on child restraint’s harness system holds the child in place within the restraint. One system, the three-point harness, has straps that come down over each of the infant’s shoulders and buckle together at the crotch. The five-point harness system has two shoulder straps, two hip straps and a crotch strap. A shield may take the place of hip straps. A T-shaped shield has shoulder straps that are attached to a flat pad which rests low against the child’s body. A shelf- or armrest-type shield has straps that are attached to a wide, shelf-like shield that swings up or to the side.


When choosing a child restraint, be sure the child restraint is designed to be used in a vehicle. If it is, it will have a label saying that it meets federal motor vehicle safety standards.


A booster seat (F-G) is a child restraint designed to improve the fit of the vehicle’s safety belt system. Some booster seats have a shoulder belt positioner, and some high-back booster seats have a five-point harness. A booster seat can also help a child to see out the window.


1-38


Then follow the instructions for the restraint. You may find these instructions on the restraint itself or in a booklet, or both. These restraints use the belt system in your vehicle, but the child also has to be secured within the restraint to help reduce the chance of personal injury. When securing an add-on child restraint, refer to the instructions that come with the restraint which may be on the restraint itself or in a booklet, or both, and to this manual. The child restraint instructions are important, so if they are not available, obtain a replacement copy from the manufacturer. Where to Put the Restraint Accident statistics show that children are safer if they are restrained in the rear rather than the front seat. General Motors, therefore, recommends that child restraints be secured in a rear seat, including an infant riding in a rear-facing infant seat, a child riding in a forward-facing child seat and an older child riding in a booster seat.


Neverput a rear-facing child restraint in the front passenger seat. Here’s why:


restra


in a rear cing child


: can be A ( seriously injured or killed if the right front passenger’s air bag inflates. This is because the back of the rear-facing child restraint would be very close to the inflating air bag. Always secure a rear-facing child restraint in a rear seat. You may secure a forward-facing child restraint in the right front seat, but before you do, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It’s better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.


1-39


Top Strap


Some child restraints have a top strap, or “top tether”. It can help restrain the child restraint during a collision. For it to work, a top strap must be properly anchored to the vehicle. Some top strap-equipped child restraints are designed for use with or without the top strap being anchored. Others require the top strap always to be anchored. Be sure to read and follow the instructions for your child restraint. If yours requires that the top strap be anchored, don’t use the restraint unless it is anchored properly. If the child restraint does not have a top strap, one can be obtained, in kit form, for many child restraints. Ask the child restraint manufacturer whether or not a kit is available.


A child in a child restraint in the center front seat can be badly injured or killed by the right front passenger’s air bag if it inflates. Never secure a child restraint in the center front seat. It’s always better to secure a child restraint in the rear seat. You may secure a forward-facing child restraint in the right front passenger seat, but before you do, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It’s better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.


Wherever you install it, be sure to secure the child restraint properly. Keep in mind that an unsecured child restraint can move around in a collision or sudden stop and injure people in the vehicle. Be sure to properly secure any child restraint in your vehicle - even when no child is in it.


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Top Strap Anchor Location Your vehicle has top strap anchors already installed for ir Id them behind the rear seating positions. You’ll fi the rear seat filler panel. In order to get to a bracket, you’ll trim cover.


t-


lave to open the n


Lower Anchorages and Top Tethers for Children (LATCH System) Your vehicle has the LATCH system. You’ll find anchors (A) in all three rear seating positions.


In order to use the system, you need either a forward-facing child restraint that has attaching points (B) at its base and a top tether anchor (C), or a rear-facing child restraint that has attaching points (B), as shown here.


If your child restraint is equipped with the LATCH system, see “Lower Anchorages and Top Tethers for Children (LATCH System)” following.


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To assist you in locating the lower anchors for this child restraint system, each seating position with the LATCH system will have a dot on the seatback directly above the anchor.


A. Vehicle anchor B. LATCH system attachment points C. Top strap


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1


If a LATCH-type child restraint isn’t attached to its anchorage points, the restraint won’t be able to protect a child sitting there. In a crash, the child could be seriously injured or killed. Make sure that a LATCH-type child restraint is properly installed using the anchorage points, or use the vehicle’s safety belts to secure the restraint. See “Securing a Child Restraint Designed for the LATCH System’’ or “Securing a Child Restraint in a Rear Seat Position” in the Index for information on how to secure a child restraint in your vehicle.


A. Vehicle anchor B. LATCH system attachment points With this system, use the LATCH system instead of the vehicle’s safety belts to secure a child restraint.


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Securing a Child Restraint Designed for the LATCH System 1. Find the anchors for the seating position you want


to use, where the bottom of the seatback meets the back of the seat cushion.


2. Put the child restraint on the seat. 3. Attach the anchor points on the child restraint to the


anchors in the vehicle. The child restraint instructions will show you how.


4. If the child restraint is forward-facing, attach the top


strap to the top strap anchor. See Top Strap on page 7-40. Tighten the top strap according to the child restraint instructions.


5. Push and pull the child restraint in different


directions to be sure it is secure.


To remove the child restraint, simply unhook the top strap from the top tether anchor and then disconnect the anchor points.


Securing a Child Restraint in a Rear Outside Seat Position


If your child restraint is equipped with the LATCH system, see Lower Anchorages and Top Tethers for Children (LATCH System) on page 7-42. You’ll be using the lap-shoulder belt. See Top Strap on page 7-40 if the child restraint has one. Be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint. Secure the child in the child restraint when and as the instructions say.


1. Put the restraint on the seat 2. Pick up the latch plate, and run the lap and shoulder


portions of the vehicle’s safety belt through or around the restraint. The child restraint instructions will show you how. Tilt the latch plate to adjust the belt if needed.


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3. Buckle the belt. Make sure the release button is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.


4. Pull the rest of the shoulder belt all the way out of


the retractor to set the lock.


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5. To tighten the belt, feed the shoulder belt back into


the retractor while you push down on the child restraint. If you’re using a forward-facing child restraint, you may find it helpful to use your knee to push down on the child restraint as you tighten the belt.


6. Push and pull the child restraint in different


directions to be sure it is secure.


To remove the child restraint, just unbuckle the vehicle’s safety belt and let it go back all the way. The safety belt will move freely again and be ready to work for an adult or larger child passenger.


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Securing a Child Restraint in a Center Rear Seat Position


If your child restraint is equipped with the latch system, see Lower Anchorages and Top Tethers for Children (LATCH System) on page 1-42. You’ll be using the lap belt. Be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint. Secure the child restraint when and as the instructions say.


A child in a child restraint in the center front seat can be badly injured or killed by the right front passenger’s air bag if it inflates. Never secure a child restraint in the center front seat. It’s always better to secure a child restraint in the rear seat. You may secure a forward-facing child restraint in the right front passenger seat, but before you do, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It’s better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.


See Top Strap on page 1-40 if the child restraint has one.


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1.


.- 3 . 3.


Make the belt as long as possible by tilting the latch plate and pulling it along the belt. PC!! the rectr2int e!? thP se2t Run the vehicle’s safety belt through or around the restraint. The child restraint instructions will show you how.


4.


5.


Buckle the belt. Make sure the release button is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to. To tighten the belt, pull its free end while you push down on the child restraint. If you’re using a forward-facing child restraint, you may find it helpful to use your knee to push the child restraint as you tighten the belt.


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6. Push and pull the child restraint in different


directions to be sure it is secure.


Your vehicle has a right fmnt passenger air bag. Never put a rear-facing child re lint in this seat. Here’s why:


To remove the child restraint, just unbuckle the vehicle’s safety belt. It will be ready to work for an adult or larger child passenger. Securing a Child Restraint in the Right Front Seat Position


If your child restraint is equipped with the LATCH system, see Lower Anchorages and Top Tethers for Children (LATCH System) on page 1-42.


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A child in a rear-facing hild restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the right front passenger’s air bag inflates. This is because the back of the rear-facing child restraint would be very close to the inflating air bag. Always secure a rear-facing child restraint in a rear seat.


Although a rear seat is a safer place, you can secure a forward-facing child restraint in the right front seat. You’ll be using the lap-shoulder belt. See Top Strap on page 1-40 if the child restraint has one. Be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint. Secure the child in the child restraint when and as the instructions say.


1. Because your vehicle has a right front passenger air bag, always move the seat as far back as it will go before securing a forward-facing child restraint. See “Seats” in the Index.


2. Put the restraint on the seat.


3. Pick up the latch plate, and run the lap and shoulder


portions of the vehicle’s safety belt through or around the restraint. The child restraint instructions will show you how. Tilt the latch plate to adjust the belt if needed.


4. Buckle the belt. Make sure the release button is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.


5. Pull the rest of the shoulder belt all the way out of


the retractor to set the lock.


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6. To tighten the belt, feed the shoulder belt back into


the retractor while you push down on the child restraint. You may find it helpful to use your knee to push down on the child restraint as you tighten the belt.


7. Push and pull the child restraint in different


directions to be sure it is secure.


To remove the child restraint, just unbuckle the vehicle’s safety belt and let it go back all the way. The safety belt will move freely again and be ready to work for an adult or larger child passenger.


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Air Bag Systems This part explains the frontal and side impact air bag systems. Your vehicle has air bags - a frontal air bag for the driver and another frontal air bag for the right front passenger. Your vehicle may also have a side impact air bag for the driver. If your vehicle has a side impact air bag for the driver it will say AIR BAG on the air bag covering on the side of the driver’s seatback closest to the door.


Frontal air bags are designed to help reduce the risk sf injury from the force of an inflating frontal air bag. But these air bags must inflate very quickly to do their job and comply with federal regulations.


Here are the most important things to know about the air bag systems:


1 a crash


-y injured 01


You can be seve if you aren’t wearing your safety belt, even if you have air bags. Wearing your safety belt during a crash helps reduce your chance of hitting things inside the vehicle or being ejected from it. Air bags are designed to work with safety belts but don’t replace them. Frontal air bags for the driver and right front in passenger are designed to deploy only moderate to severe frontal and near frontal crashes. They aren’t designed to inflate at all in rollover, rear or low-speed frontal crashes, or in many side crashes. And, for some unrestrained occupants, frontal air bags may providp !PSS protection in frontal crashes than more forceful air bags have provided in the past. CAUTION:


(Continued)


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The side impact air bag for the driver is designed to inflate only in moderate to severe crashes where something hits the driver’s side of your vehicle. It isn’t designed to inflate in frontal, in rollover or in rear crashes. Everyone in your vehicle should wear a safety belt properly, whether or not there’s an air bag for that person.


with great force, faster than the blink of an eye. If you’re too close to an inflating air bag, as you would be if you were leaning forward, it could seriously injure you. Safety belts help keep you in position for air bag inflation before and during a crash. Always wear your safety belt, even with frontal air bags. The driver should sit as far back as possible while still maintaining control of the vehicle, and should not lean on the door.


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3 is up aJns


., 3r very close to,


1 -‘one u any air bag when it inflates can be seriously injured or killed. Air bags plus lap-shoulder belts offer the best protection for adults, but not for young children and infants. Neither the vehicle’s safety belt system nor its air bag system is designed for them. Young children and infants need the protection that a child restraint system can provide. Always secure children properly in your vehicle. To read how, see the part of this manual called “Older Children” or “Infants and Young Children”.


There is an air bag readiness light on the instrument panel, which shows the air bag symbol.


The system checks the air bag electrical system for malfunctions. The light tells you if there is an electrical problem. See Air Bag Readiness Light on page 3-30 for more information.


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Where Are the Air Bags?


The driver’s frontal air bag is in the middle of the steering wheel.


The right front passenger’s frontal air bag is in the instrument panel on the passenger’s side.


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If your vehicle has one, the driver’s side impact air bag is in the side of the driver’s seatback closest to the door.


If something is between an occupant and an air bag, the bag might not inflate properly or it might force the object into that person causing severe injury or even death. The path of an inflating air bag must be kept clear. Don’t put anything between an occupant and an air bag, and don’t attach or put anything on the steering wheel hub or on or near any other air bag covering. Don’t let seat covers block the inflation path of a side impact air bag.


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When Should an Air Bag Inflate? The driver’s and right front passenger’s frontal air bags are designed to inflate in moderate to severe frontal or near-frontal crashes. But they are designed to inflate only if the impact speed is above the system’s designed “threshold level.” If the front of your vehicle goes straight into a wall that doesn’t move or deform, the threshold level is about 12 to 18 mph (1 9 to 29 km/h). The threshold level can vary, however, with specific vehicle design, so that it can be somewhat above or below this range. If your vehicle strikes something that will move or deform, such as a parked car, the threshold level will be higher. The driver’s and right front passenger’s frontal air bags are not designed to inflate in rollovers, rear impacts, or in many side impacts because inflation would not help the occupant.


Your vehicle may or may not have a side impact air bag. See Air Bag Systems in the Index. A driver ’s side impact air bag is designed to inflate in moderate to severe side crashes involving the driver’s door. A side impact air bag will inflate if the crash severity is above the system’s designed “threshold level.” The threshold level can vary with specific vehicle design. A driver’s side impact air bag is not designed to inflate in frontal or near-frontal impacts, rollovers or rear impacts, because inflation would not help the occupant. In any particular crash, no one can say whether an air bag should have inflated simply because of the damage to a vehicle or because of what the repair costs were. For frontal air bags, inflation is determined by the angle of the impact and how quickly the vehicle slows down in frontal and near-frontal impacts. For side impact air bags, inflation is determined by the location and severity of the impact.


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But the frontal air bags would not help you in many types of collisions, including rollovers, rear impacts, and many side impacts, primarily because an occupant’s motion is not toward the air bag. A side impact air bag would not help you in many types of collisions, including frontal or near frontal collisions, rollovers, and rear impacts, primarily because an occupant’s motion is not toward that air bag. Air bags should never be regarded as anything more than a supplement to safety belts, and then only in moderate to severe frontal or near-frontal collisions for the driver’s and right front passenger’s frontal air bags, and only in moderate to severe side collisions for vehicles with a driver’s side impact air bag.


What Makes an Air Bag Inflate? In an impact of sufficient severity, the air bag sensing system detects that the vehicle is in a crash. For both the frontal and side impact air bags, the sensing system triggers a release of gas from the inflator, which inflates the air bag. The inflator, air bag and related hardware are all part of the air bag modules. Frontal air bag modules are located inside the steering wheel and instrument panel. For vehicles with a driver’s side impact air bag, the air bag moules are located in the seatback closest to the driver’s door. How Does an Air Bag Restrain? In moderate to severe frontal or near frontal collisions, even belted occupants can contact the steering wheel or the instrument panel. In moderate to severe side collisions, even belted occupants can contact the inside of the vehicle. The air bag supplements the protection provided by safety belts. Air bags distribute the force of the impact more evenly over the occupant’s upper body, stopping the occupant more gradually.


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What Will You See After an Air Bag Inflates? After the air bag inflates, it quickly deflates, so quickly that some people may not even realize the air bag inflated. Some components of the air bag module - the steering wheel hub for the driver’s air bag, the instrument panel for the right front passenger’s bag, the side of the seatback closest to the door for the driver’s side impact air bag - will be hot for a short time. The parts of the bag that come into contact with you may be warm, but not too hot to touch. There will be some smoke and dust coming from the vents in the deflated air bags. Air bag inflation doesn’t prevent the driver from seeing or being able to steer the vehicle, nor does it stop people from leaving the vehicle.


When an air bag inflates, there is dust in the air. This dust could cause breathing problems for people with a history of asthma or other breathing trouble. To avoid this, everyone in the vehicle should get out as soon as it is safe to do so. If you have breathing problems but can’t get out of the vehicle after an air bag inflates, then get fresh air by opening a window or a door. If you experience breathing problems following an air bag deployment, you should seek medical attention.


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In many crashes severe enough to inflate an air bag, windshields are broken by vehicle deformation. Additional windshield breakage may also occur from the right front passenger air bag.


Air bags are designed to inflate only once. After an air bag inflates, you’ll need some new parts for your air bag system. If you don’t get them, the air bag system won’t be there to help protect you in another crash. A new system will include air bag modules and possibly other parts. The service manual for your vehicle covers the need to replace other parts. Your vehicle is equipped with a crash sensing and diagnostic module, which records information about the frontal air bag system. The module records information about the readiness of the system, when the system commands air bag


inflation and driver’s safety belt usage at deployment. The module also records speed, engine RPM, brake and throttle data. Let only qualified technicians work on your air bag systems. Improper service can mean that an air bag system won’t work properly. See your dealer for service.


Notice: If you damage the covering for the driver’s or the right front passenger’s air bag, or the air bag covering on the driver’s seatback, the bag may not work properly. You may have to replace the air bag module in the steering wheel, both the air bag module and the instrument panel for the right front passenger’s air bag, or the air bag module and seatback for the driver’s side impact air bag. Do not open or break the air bag coverings.


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Servicing Your Air Bag-Equipped Vehicle Air bags affect how your vehicle should be serviced. There are parts of the air bag systems in several places around your vehicle. Your dealer and the service manual have information about servicing your vehicle and the air bag systems. To purchase a service manual, see Service Publications Ordering Information on page 7- 10.


For up to 10 seconds after the ignition key is turned off and the battery is disconnected, an air bag can still inflate during improper service. You can be injured if you are close to an air bag when it inflates. Avoid yellow connectors. They are probably part of the air bag system. Be sure to follow proper service procedures, and make sure the person performing work for you is qualified to do so.


The air bag systems do not need regular maintenance.


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Restraint System Check


Checking Your Restraint Systems


Now and then, make sure the safety belt reminder light and all your belts, buckles, latch plates, retractors and anchorages are working properly. Look for any other loose or damaged safety belt system parts. If you see anything that might keep a safety belt system from doing its job, have it repaired. Torn or frayed safety belts may not protect you in a crash. They can rip apart under impact forces. If a belt is torn or frayed, get a new one right away. Also look for any opened or broken air bag covers, and have them repaired or replaced. (The air bag system does not need regular maintenance.)


Replacing Restraint System Parts After a Crash


A crash can damage the restraint systems in your vehicle. A damaged restraint system may not properly protect the person using it, resulting in serious injury or even death in a crash. To help make sure your restraint systems are working properly after a crash, have them inspected and any necessary replacements made as soon as possible.


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If you’ve had a crash, do you need new belts or LATCH system parts? After a very minor collision, nothing may be necessary. But if the belts were stretched, as they would be if worn during a more severe crash, then you need new parts. If the LATCH system was being used during a more severe crash, you may need new LATCH system parts.


If belts are cut or damaged, replace them. Collision damage also may mean you will need to have LATCH system, safety belt or seat parts repaired or replaced. New parts and repairs may be necessary even if the belt or LATCH system wasn’t being used at the time of the collision. If an air bag inflates, you’ll need to replace air bag system parts. See the part on the air bag system earlier in this section.


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Section 2


Features and Controls


Keys ............................................................ 2-2


Windows ...................... ......


Remote Keyless Entry System ......................... 2.4 Remote Keyless Entry System Operation ........... 2.5 Doors and Locks ............................................ 2.10 Door Locks .................................................. 2.10 Power Door Locks ........................................ 2-11 Programmable Automatic Door Locks .............. 2.11 Lockout Protection ........................................ 2.12 Leaving Your Vehicle .................................... 2.12 Trunk ............................................... .... 2.13 , ....... 2.15 .... 2.16 ............... 2.16 ................... 2.17 [email protected] II ............................................... 2.17 Starting and Operating Your Vehicle ................ 2.19 New Vehicle Break-In .................................... 2.19 . . . . . . . 3-1 9 lrpitinn Positions Starting Your Engine ..................................... 2.20 ........... 2.2 1 Engine Coolant Heater ............... , . . -2-23 Automatic Transaxle Operation


Windows Power Sun Visors Theft-Deterrent Systems


.................


....


.............


.... -2-26 Parking Brake .............. Shifting Into Park (P) ......... 2-26 Shifting Out of Park (P) ................................. 2-29 Parking Over Things That Burn ....................... 2-29 Engine Exhaust ........................................... -2-30 Running Your Engine While You Are Parked .... 2-31 Mirrors ........................................................... 2-32 Manual Rearview Mirror ................................. 2-32 Manual Rearview Mirror with OnStap .............. 2-32 Automatic Dimming Rearview Mirror ............ 2-33 Automatic Dimming Rearview Mirror with


OnStaP ................................................... 2-33 ........................ 2-34 Outside Power Mirrors .... Outside Convex Mirror ................................... 2-34 [email protected] System ............................................. 2-35 Storage Areas ................................................ 2-37 Glove Box ................................................... 2-37 F. ront Storage Area ................... ..... 2-37 Storage Area ..... ..... 2-37 Center Console Convenience Net .................. ..... 2-37 ..... 2-38


Sunroof ...


?- 1


I a vehicle wit


Leaving childrer ignition key is dangerous for many reasons. A child or others could be badly injured or even killed. They could operate the power windows or other controls or even make the vehicle move. Don’t leave the keys in a vehicle with children.


2-2


The ignition key is for the ignition only.


The door key


is for the


The ignition and door keys don’t have plugs. Your dealer or Buick Roadside Assistance has the code for your keys. If you need a new ignition or door key, contact your

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