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21

Children depend on adults to protect them. However, despite their best intentions, many parents and other adults may not know how to protect young passengers.

properly

So if you have children, or if you ever need to drive with a grandchild or other children in your car, be sure to read this section.

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Children Should Sit in the Back Seat According to accident statistics, children of all ages and sizes are safer when they are restrained in the back seat, not the front seat. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Transport Canada recommend that all children ages 12 and under be properly restrained in the back seat.

In the back seat, children are less likely to be injured by striking hard interior parts during a collision or hard braking. Also, children cannot be injured by an inflating airbag when they ride in the back.

The Passenger’s Front Airbag Poses Serious Risks to Children Front airbags have been designed to help protect adults in a moderate to severe frontal collision. To do this, the passenger’s front airbag is quite large, and it inflates with tremendous speed.

Infants Neverputarear-facingchildseatin thefrontseatofavehicleequipped If withapassenger’sfrontairbag. the airbag inflates, it can hit the back of the child seat with enough force to kill or very seriously injure an infant.

Protecting Children

AdditionalPrecautionstoParents Neverholdaninfantorchildon If you are not wearing a yourlap. seat belt in a crash, you could be thrown forward into the dashboard and crush the child.

If you are wearing a seat belt, the child can be torn from your arms during a crash. For example, if your car crashes into a parked car at 30 mph (48 km/h), a 20-lb (9 kg) infant will become a 600-lb (275 kg) force, and you will not be able to hold on.

Neverputaseatbeltoveryourself During a andaninfantorchild. crash, the belt could press deep into the child and cause very serious injuries.

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Driver and Passenger Safety

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Protecting Children

SmallChildren Placingaforward-facingchildseatin thefrontseatofavehicleequipped withapassenger’sfrontairbagcan If the vehicle seat is behazardous. too far forward, or the child’s head is thrown forward during a collision, an inflating front airbag can strike the child with enough force to kill or very seriously injure a small child.

U.S.Models To remind you of the passenger’s front airbag hazards, and that children must be properly restrained in the back seat, your car has warninglabelsonthedashboardand on the driver’s and front passenger’s visors. Please read and follow the instructions on these labels.

Whenever possible,

LargerChildren Childrenwhohaveoutgrownchild seatsarealsoatriskofbeinginjured orkilledbyaninflatingpassenger’s frontairbag. larger children should sit in the back seat, in a booster seat if needed, and be properly restrained with a seat belt. (See page information about protecting larger children.)

for important

37

CONTINUED

Driver and Passenger Safety

23

Main MenuTable of Contentsst 02/07/09 17:05:38 31S5P620 0027 

Protecting Children

CanadianModels To remind you of the front airbag hazards, your car has warning labels on the driver’s and front passenger’s visors. Please read and follow the instructions on these labels.

If You Must Drive with Several Children Your car has three seating positions in the back seat where children can be properly restrained.

If you ever have to carry more than three children in your car:

Place the largest child in the front seat, provided the child is large enough to wear a seat belt properly (see page

37

).

Move the vehicle seat as far to the rear as possible (see page

13

).

Have the child sit upright and well back in the seat (see page

18

).

Make sure the seat belt is properly positioned and secured (see page 16

).

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Driver and Passenger Safety

If a Child Requires Close Attention Many parents say they prefer to put an infant or small child in the front passenger seat so they can watch the child, or because the child requires attention.

Placing a child in the front seat exposes the child to hazards from the passenger’s front airbag, and paying close attention to a child distracts the driver from the important tasks of driving, placing both of you at risk.

If a child requires physical attention or frequent visual contact, we strongly recommend that another adult ride with the child in the back seat. The back seat is far safer for a child than the front.

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Protecting Children

Even very young

Keepcarkeysandremote transmittersoutofthereachof children. children learn how to unlock vehicle doors, turn on the ignition, and open the trunk, which can lead to accidental injury or death.

Additional Safety Precautions

Donotleavechildrenaloneinyour Leaving children without vehicle. adult supervision is illegal in most states and Canadian provinces, and can be very hazardous. For example, infants and small childrenleftinavehicleonahot day can die from heatstroke. And children left alone with the key in the ignition can accidentally set the vehicle in motion, possibly injuring themselves or others.

Lockbothdoorsandthetrunk whenyourcarisnotinuse. Children who play in cars can accidentally get trapped inside the trunk and be seriously injured or could die. Teach your children not to play in or around cars. Know how to operate the emergency trunk opener and decide if your children should be shown how to use this feature (See page

89

).

Driver and Passenger Safety

25

Main MenuTable of Contentsst 02/07/09 17:05:54 31S5P620 0029 

Protecting Children

General Guidelines for Using Child Seats The following pages give general guidelines for selecting and installing child seats for infants and small children.

SelectingaChildSeat To provide proper protection, a child seat should meet three requirements:

1.

Thechildseatshouldmeetsafety The child seat should standards. meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213 (FMVSS 213) or Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213 (CMVSS 213). Look for the manufacturer’s statement of compliance on the box and seat.

2.

Thechildseatshouldbeofthe propertypeandsizetofitthechild.

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Driver and Passenger Safety

Childrenuptoaboutone

Infants: year old should be restrained in a rear-facing, reclining child seat. Only a rear-facing seat provides the proper support to protect an infant’s head, neck, and back. See page 30 for additional information on protecting infants.

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3.

Thechildseatshouldfitthe vehicleseatingposition(or positions)whereitwillbeused.

Due to variations in the design of child seats, vehicle seats, and seat belts, all child seats will not fit all vehicle seating positions.

However, Honda is confident that one or more child seat models can fit andbeproperlyinstalledinall recommended seating positions in your car.

A child who is too

SmallChildren: large for a rear-facing child seat, and who can sit up without support, should be restrained in a forward- facing child seat. See page for additional information on protecting small children.

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Protecting Children

Before purchasing a child seat, we recommend that parents test the child seat in the specific vehicle seating position (or positions) where they intend to use the seat. If a previously purchased child seat does not fit, you may need to buy a different one that will fit.

Your car has lower anchors installed for use with LATCH (Lower AnchorsandTethersforChildren)- compatible child seats. For more information, see page

43

.

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Driver and Passenger Safety

27

Main MenuTable of Contentsst 02/07/09 17:06:17 31S5P620 0031 

Protecting Children

PlacingaChildSeat This page briefly summarizes Honda’s recommendations on where to place rear-facing and forward- facing child seats in your car.

Airbags Pose Serious

Risks to Children

The passenger’s front airbag inflates with enough force to kill or seriously injure an infant in a rear-facing child seat.

A small child in a forward-facing child seat is also at risk. If the vehicle seat is too far forward, or the child’s head is thrown forward during a collision, an inflating front airbag can kill or seriously injure the child.

If a small child must ride in the front, follow the instructions provided in this section.

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Driver and Passenger Safety

FrontPassenger’sSeat Infants:

Never in the front seat, due

to the front airbag hazard.

Smallchildren:

Not recommended, due to the front airbag hazard. If a small child must ride in front, move the vehicle seat to the rear- most position and secure a front- facing child seat with the seat belt (see page

35

).

BackSeats Infants:

Recommended positions. Properlysecurearear-facingchild seat (see page

31

).

Smallchildren:

Recommended

positions. Properly secure a front- facing child seat (see page

35

).

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InstallingaChildSeat After selecting a proper child seat, and a good position to install the seat, there are three main steps in installing the seat:

To provide security during normal driving maneuvers as well as during a collision, we recommend that parents secure a child seat as firmly as possible.

1.

All child seats are

Properlysecurethechildseatto thecar. designed to be secured to the car with the lap part of a lap/shoulder belt. Some child seats can be secured to the vehicle’s LATCH anchorage system instead. A child whose seat is not properly secured to the car can be endangered in a crash. See pages for 43 instructions on how to properly secure child seats in this car.

31 35

and

,

2.

After installing a child

Makesurethechildseatisfirmly secured. seat, push and pull the seat forward and from side to side to verify that it is secure.

However, a child seat does not need to be ‘‘rock solid.’’ In some vehicles or seating positions, it may be difficult to install a child seat so that

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